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Balancing With Blocks

Who much does it weigh?

  • Directions

    1. Obtain spring and/or balance scales that measure in ounces or grams, such as those for weighing letters or foods. Demonstrate how to use them carefully.
    2. Weigh wooden blocks. Combine several. Balance different shapes and sizes to get the same weight. Arrange blocks from lightest to heaviest. Experiment.
    3. With a teacher's help, use Crayola® Washable Markers to make a chart to record block weights. Draw pictures of blocks and leave space to record their weights.
    4. Weigh blocks with a friend. Record block weights on the chart. Compare weights of different blocks. What combinations weigh the same?
  • Standards

    LA: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade level topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

    LA: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

    MATH: Describe and compare measurable attributes.

    VA: Use visual structures of art to communicate ideas.

  • Adaptations

    Possible classroom resources include: Measuring Weight (Simple Measurement) by Julia Vogel; You Can Use a Balance (Rookie Read-About Science) by Linda Bullock

    Students make a chart of sets of blocks that have the same weight. Students may sketch the block shapes to represent the weights. For example, 2 rectangular blocks may weigh the same as 3 circular blocks and one wooden rhombus.

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