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Letter Detectives

Who knows their letters?

  • Directions

    1. Lots of reading and telling stories, fingerplays, children’s dictated lists and stories, noticing signs and labels—a variety of early literacy activities come before children can begin to identify letters.
    2. Talk with children as they search for letters. Find out what they understand about literacy, cutting, and gluing. Build activities to suit individual skills and interests.
    3. Staple four or five sheets of white paper along one edge to make a book.
    4. On the cover, use a Crayola® Washable Marker to write your name and then the words Letter Detective. Write the date, too.
    5. In recycled magazines, be a Letter Detective. Search for interesting letters, perhaps giant-size ones, letters in your name, or upper-case letters.
    6. Cut them out with Crayola® Scissors.
    7. Arrange letters in an interesting way on each page. Attach with Crayola® School Glue. Name letters you detected.
  • Standards

    LA: Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.

    LA: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

    LA: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade level topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

    LA: Participate in shared research and writing projects.

    LA: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

    VA: Use visual structures of art to communicate ideas.

  • Adaptations

    This activity can be expanded to look at consonant blends.

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