Aboriginal Art

Aboriginal Art lesson plan

Look deep into an Ancient culture, and decode a visual language of simple dots and lines! Use these symbols to create a meaningful unique design.

  • 1.

    Traditional Aboriginal artwork is most known for its distinctive use of dots and lines. Ask students to find examples of Aboriginal artwork and research the symbolism of the dots and lines in each piece. What can they tell about their daily lives from these simple depictions?

  • 2.

    Students use the Aboriginal symbols found to create their own original work of art! On black construction paper, draw an Aboriginal design with Crayola Slick Stix™. Slick Stix contain pigments that may stain clothing, fabrics and other household surfaces. Have students wear a smock to protect their clothing and cover their work surface with recycled newspaper. Experiment with the Slick Stix to make interesting lines, swirls, and dots of various weights and textures!

  • 3.

    Encourage students to enhance their drawings with a 3D effect! Flatten a small amount of Crayola Model Magic® on a hard surface such as a table. Firmly press a circular Model Magic Presto Dots™ tool or a Crayola Marker cap into the flattened modeling compound, and lift to create a Model Magic dot! Model Magic that is fresh from the pack will stick to itself. Dried pieces can be glued together. Attached dots to the drawing with Crayola No-Run School Glue.

Standards

  • LA: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • LA: Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • LA: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • LA: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
  • MATH: Compose two-dimensional shapes or three-dimensional shapes.
  • SCI: Ask questions about the natural and human-built worlds.
  • SS: Describe ways in which language, stories, folktales, music, and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture and influence behavior of people living in a particular culture.
  • SS: Describe how people create places that reflect ideas, personality, culture, and wants and needs as they design homes, playgrounds, classrooms, and the like.
  • VA: Use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories.
  • VA: Select and use subject matter, symbols, and ideas to communicate meaning.
  • VA: Know that the visual arts have both a history and specific relationship to various cultures.
  • VA: Identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum.

Adaptations

  • Student groups can research similarities and differences in the way the Aboriginal people and Native Americans were treated by European immigrants. Student groups will write a collaborative, compare/contrast essay describing their findings.
  • With in-depth research, students may choose to write and present a play or presentation (in person or video) of their findings of a civilization other than the Aborigines. Students should expect to develop their play or presentation in written format before transferring it to a performance.
  • Students may research a well-known artist from earlier times and prepare an electronic presentation for classmates which summarizes this research. This presentation, in the format of a PowerPoint or Glogster, can be uploaded to the classroom computer for viewing.
  • Student groups can research similarities and differences in the way the Aboriginal people and Native Americans were treated by European immigrants. Student groups will write a collaborative, compare/contrast essay describing their findings.
  • Look for text resources to recommend.