British Rounders

British Rounders lesson plan

Go around the bases the British way! Create an authentic Rounders playing area, and learn to play baseball as the English do.

  • 1.

    Rounders originated in England and is very similar to U.S. baseball and softball. In both games there are nine innings, a diamond-shaped playing area, and three outs per inning. In Rounders, the batter hits a ball and runs around four bases to score a rounder. The team with the most rounders at the end of the game wins.

  • 2.

    One major difference in the games is that in Rounders you are not allowed to throw the bat after hitting the ball and running to first base. Have students find out the official rules for Rounders. Use Crayola® Erasable Colored Pencils and white paper to make a chart that compares the U.S. baseball or softball to British rounders. What other similarities did you find? What differences are there? Students discuss their findings with classmates.

  • 3.

    Take students to an asphalt or concrete surface that is at least 6 months old. Make sure the area will provide adequate space to play Rounders safely. With a Crayola Washable Sidewalk Paint Kit, test a spot to make sure the paint will not stain.

  • 4.

    Have students mix the paint colors and paint the Rounders playing area with the paint roller and Crayola® So Big® Brush in the kit. A typical Rounders playing field is diamond shaped. Measure the exact dimensions of the field.

  • 5.

    Paints wash from skin with soap and water. Normal laundering procedures remove stains from most cotton, polyester, acrylic fabrics, and their blends. For best results, wash immediately in hot water. Do not use pre-wash products as they may set stains. Severe staining may require repeat laundering or all-fabric bleach.

  • 6.

    After the paint dries, get the necessary equipment to play the game. A tennis ball is used as the ball and typically a flat bat is used to hit the ball. A baseball bat will also work. Now you are ready to play Rounders!

  • 7.

    Remove paint after 2 weeks if it has not washed off in the rain. Wash surface with the water pressure from a garden hose. Light brushing with a broom or nylon brush may be necessary to remove some paint.

Standards

  • LA: Read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grade level text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • LA: Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships.
  • LA: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade level topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • LA: Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.
  • LA: Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
  • MATH: Convert like measurement units within a given measurement system.
  • SS: Compare ways in which people from different cultures think about and deal with they physical environment and social conditions.
  • VA: Select and use the qualities of structures and functions of art to improve communication of their ideas.

Adaptations

  • Compare and contrast Rounders and American Baseball, including the playing fields.
  • Students research other British sports. Organize research into an electronic format for presentation to classmates.
  • Challenge students to create a variation of the game of baseball. Paint the playing area and explain the rules to your classmates before challenging them to play the game.
  • American Baseball has many well-known athletes, past and present. Invite students to investigate athlete-heroes from the British Rounder sport.