Division Drag Race Board Game

Division Drag Race Board Game lesson plan

Looking for a fun way to practice long division with remainders? Create a board game to race cars to the finish.

  • 1.

    Students use Crayola Markers and a ruler to create a drag race course on large paper or poster board. Make same-size tracks for cars to move along from the start to finish line. Be sure each lane has the same number of spaces!

  • 2.

    Students build cars for the game with Crayola Model Magic®. Press and indent areas to create the car shape. Roll and flatten small pieces to make bumpers, lights, or steering wheels, for example. Air-dry the cars for 24 hours.

  • 3.

    Students cut paper cards for the game with Crayola Scissors. On each card, write a division problem with Crayola Markers. When a player solves the division problem, that person’s car may move the number of spaces shown in the remainder of the solution. Make enough division problem cards so each game will be different, including a few without remainders!

  • 4.

    Cover the art area with recycled newspaper. With Crayola Premier™ Tempera Paints, decorate your drag racers.

  • 5.

    When the paint is dry, cover the colors with Crayola Pearl It! Tempera Mixing Medium to give the paint a shimmer. Cover unpainted Model Magic with Pearl It! to give it a light-reflective glass or metal look. Air-dry the paint.

  • 6.

    Play the game. Line up the cars at the start. Take turns solving division problems. Find the remainder and then move the car the same number of spaces as the remainder. First car to the finish wins the race!

Standards

  • LA: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • LA: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade level topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • MATH: Find whole-number quotients of whole numbers with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division.
  • VA: Use visual structures of art to communicate ideas.
  • VA: Select and use subject matter, symbols, and ideas to communicate meaning.

Adaptations

  • Students create division problems for the game. Encourage students to create multiple levels of problems in order to challenge players as their division skills improve. Students determine a system for identifying the various levels of problems, such as one dot for simple problems, two dots for increasingly difficult problems, and three dots for the most challenging problems.
  • Students create their own marker for the game. Provide students with a size and encourage them to create a marker that represents their originality. If the markers are paper, it may be wise to laminate them.
  • Students collaborate to create and rules for their game. The rules need to be hand written or word processed with correct use of all English language conventions and grammar. Students may also want to illustrate the background of their rules.