Picture Story Scroll

Have fun with reading comprehension! Tell the events of a story through original drawings.

  • 1.

    Cut white paper lengthwise to create two long strips. Glue the strips together to create a long piece of paper. Allow the glue to dry.

  • 2.

    Glue the edges of the white paper to construction paper. Allow the glue to dry.

  • 3.

    Roll the construction paper and glue the edge of the roll to the white paper. Allow the glue to dry overnight.

  • 4.

    Repeat steps 1-3 until you have enough “scrolls” for your entire class.

  • 5.

    Give each student a pre-made “scroll” and a set of Crayola® Classic Crayons.

  • 6.

    Instruct the students to draw pictures that represent the order of events in any story recently read aloud in class.

  • 7.

    Help the students roll the edges of their scroll in toward the center to finish their work.

  • 8.

    Once the students’ work is complete, ask them to find a partner. Can they correctly identify the story that inspired their partner’s work? Provide class time for discussions.

Standards

  • LA: Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  • LA: Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • LA: Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • VA: Engage in collaborative imaginative play with materials.
  • VA: Observe and investigate to make a work of art or design.

Adaptations

  • Rather than a self-selected story, all students could be assigned the same story. Ask students to independently illustrate the story. Compare and contrast understandings of the events and illustrations.
  • Add gold paint to the back of the scroll to give it a regal finish!
  • Allow the students to create a depiction of a real story in their life. Ask them to tell the story aloud to the class by showing their pictures and talking about them.
  • Reverse the process. Ask students to create illustrations that tell a story. Then have small groups of students collaborate to write the story to be accompanied by the scroll.