My First Crayola™ Developmental Stages of Art

Every Creative Journey Begins with the First Steps

Crayola believes that encouraging kids to express their thoughts at all ages is important.  We help kids express their ideas and feelings with colorful tools made for little hands that transform a child's uniquely original thoughts into visible form.  We partner with parents and early childhood educators to understand the best ways to nurture these magical creative moments in children’s lives and bring them to life.

Developement

 

Get a Grip on Your Child’s Drawing

Children discover and connect with art as they grow. So, why not give them the right tools for their growing skill level? Our drawing tools are designed so children spend less time figuring out how to hold them and more time creating! 

Palm Grip

Palm Grip

Writing grip development usually begins around 12 months with a simple palm grasp that helps to build fine and gross motor skills.

Guided Grip

Guided Grip

The triangular shape guides little fingers to a proper writing grip and promotes more purposeful and controlled drawing.

Traditional Grip

Traditional Grip

The traditional round shape provides a transition to a mature drawing and writing grip.

 

Development Stages of Young Children’s Art

Development stages progress in a predictable, universal sequence for children.  The ages of the progression—when an individual child will reach a milestone—are very personal.  Children’s artistic skills also evolve in stages—but at their own pace.  So, encourage, observe and enjoy the magic of their creative journey!

Unexpected Art

As toddlers move their arms and drag their fingers through colorful foods, something unexpected happens.  Their first art experiences are when they realize their motions leave marks while exploring the textures, colors and tastes in the highchair.

kids art

Creating Marks

Children learn “cause and effect” when they realize, “If I do this, I will create a mark.”  Encourage experimentation so they see how their motions create broad sweeps and colorful marks.

kids art

Deliberate Motions

Watch toddlers’ confidence increase as they experiment with new ways to scribble. Offer choices of paper colors and colorful tools to explore.

kids art

Drawings have Meanings and Names

Children begin to know “what” they are drawing, although the pictures do not yet look “representational.”  They begin to describe stories shown in their art.  Lots of scribbles could be “Mommy’s hair” today and “my bath” tomorrow.

kids art

Early Representational Drawings

Children’s first representational art (images that adults recognize) is usually a person.  They start as “tadpole people” since their heads are large and the body is usually a few lines for limbs.  Now is the time to introduce a variety of materials—paints, modeling compounds, etc.   

kids art