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Crayola Masters of Illusion

“Artists are Masters of Illusion” In this art project a series of simple images, with simple variations, are sequenced together, to blend time and art in a single, visually intriguing composition – that moves!

  • Grade 4
    Grade 5
  • 60 to 90 Minutes
  • Directions

    1. Provide each student with twenty index cards, non-ruled and white.
    2. Ask students to draw a shape on the index cards, encouraging them to start simple, with one favorite shape that is easy to replicate.
    3. Ask students what kind of journey they want this shape to take. Will it move across the card, and off the edge? Will it move in a spiral? Maybe the shape will move off the card and then re-appear!
    4. To begin, the shape can be placed anywhere on the index card. Think of your shape as a metaphor for a hero in your flip art. On each subsequent card, the shape must move, an eighth or quarter inch in a single direction that continues on the following cards. Use a Crayola® Erasable Colored Pencil in case you want to make changes.
    5. When complete, students firmly hold their stack of cards in a corner and flip the open end of the stack to see their shapes move. Students share this procedure with a friend sitting close by. What were they surprised by? When did their eyes light up? Would the shape be bolder if details and embellishments were added with metallic crayons? Or Glitter Markers? Any Erasable Pencil marks can easily be erased and changed.
    6. When complete, students firmly hold their stack of cards in a corner and flip the open end of the stack to see their shapes move. Students share this procedure with a friend sitting close by. What were they surprised by? When did their eyes light up? Would the shape be bolder if details and embellishments were added with metallic crayons? Or Glitter Markers? Any Erasable Pencil marks can easily be erased and changed.
    7. Ask students to consider what story that the flip art illustrates? Write a few brief story ideas to share with a table partner.
    8. Once “telling” the story has been practiced with friends, students take finished work home and impress family members with their ability to become a master of illusion!
  • Standards

    LA: Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

    LA: Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context.

    LA: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    MATH: Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit.

    MATH: Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots.

    VA: Understanding and applying media, techniques and processes: Describe how different materials, techniques, and processes cause different responses.

    VA: Understanding and applying media, techniques and processes: Select media, techniques, and processes; analyze what makes them effective or not effective in communicating ideas: and reflect upon the effectiveness of their choices.

    VA: Using knowledge of structures and functions: Describe how different expressive features and organizational principles cause different responses.

    VA: Using Knowledge of structures and functions: Select and use the qualities of structures and functions of art to improve communication of their ideas.

  • Adaptations

    Use a light table to assist students in seeing the movement of the shapes from one card to the next.

    Lay the cards out side by side for students to see the development of the shape movement holistically.

    Offer the choice of developing the shape and/ or the background.

    Eadweard Muybridge was a pioneer in studies of motion and a precursor of the motion picture industry. Students research Muybridge’s studies of animal in motion, and model their own study of any object in motion, drawing their object’s movement, moment by moment.

    Marcel Duchamp is a cubist painter representing a group of artists who were also fascinated by multiple-exposure photography from the same time period as Muybridge. Students copy the fractured space technique presented by Duchamp in “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2” in their own drawing of a figure to delve deeper into different master of illusion technique. For example students could draw a figure (human, animal, real or fantasy) clearly outlined in black marker. On a separate paper, draw 5 or so vertical lines, equally spaced across the page. Place the figure drawing under the paper to trace the figure, beginning with just a brief sliver of the figure showing before the first vertical line – and gradually, across the page, increase the amount of the figure showing until the full figure is traced before the final vertical line. Add simple blocks of color as seen in the Duchamp composition.

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