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Germ Shields

Illustrate the ongoing battle against germs with a graphic depiction of strategies used to keep healthy with Crayola® Window Crayons chosen for their versatility on foil surfaces.

  • Kindergarten
    Pre-Kindergarten
  • Multiple Lesson Periods
  • Directions

    1. “Germs Make Me Sick” by Melvin Berger introduces complex health ideas in a humorous, accessible, yet scientific, manner. Read the first thirteen and the last four pages of this higher level non-fiction picture book aloud to the class to tailor it to early school age children. It provides an overview of what germs are and how they infect us with illness.
    2. Ask the class to summarize some of the ways they can keep themselves healthy. Have each student pick one of these “rules for good health” to represent on a shield. How would they show these habits in a graphic way?
    3. Distribute two sturdy paper plates and a piece of aluminum foil large enough to cover the bottom of one of the plates. Ask each student to cover the plate, folding down around the edge towards the bow of the plate. To secure the foil, strengthen and provide a smooth surface on the shield’s back, glue the second plate inside the first using Crayola® No-Run School Glue. Allow to air dry.
    4. With Crayola® Window Crayons, draw the habit on the front of the shield (the bottom of the plate). Remind the students to use big, simple graphics rather than detailed one, so their message may be clearly understood.
    5. Attach with tape, a handle to the back of each shield using a recycled cardboard tube (like from a roll of masking tape). If the handles are large enough, students may slide their arms through the hole to wear the shield rather than just hold it.
  • Standards

    LA: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

    LA: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

    LA: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).

    LA: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

    LA: Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.

    SCI: Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

    SCI: Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants or animals (including humans) and the places they live.

    VA: Students will investigate, plan and work through materials and ideas to make works of art and design

    VA: Creative thinking and art making skills transfer to many aspects of life.

    VA: Students will use a variety of methods for preparing their artwork and the work of others for presentation

    VA: Students experience, analyze and interpret art and other aspects of the visual world.

  • Adaptations

    As a class write and present a short skit or puppet show for the other classes at your school about how to stay healthy.

    Keep a healthy habits log for two weeks. Design a checklist of these habits for the students to record their progress.

    To demonstrate how germs travel and get everywhere, pretend to sneeze in your hands (secretly filled with glitter) and then stand back and watch the glitter show up everywhere. Please be careful not to get glitter in anyone’s eye.

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  • Creativity.
  • Capacity.
  • Collaboration.
  • Change.
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