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Six Crows

In this lesson children are introduced to paper cutting and tearing techniques to create a murder of crows inspired by Leo Lionni’s tale of retribution and compromise, Six Crows.

  • Grade 1
    Grade 2
  • 30 to 60 minutes
  • Directions

    1. Read Six Crows by Leo Lionni to the class. As a group discuss the sequence of the story. Discuss different ways that the farmer and the crows could have resolved their problem without the help of the owl at various points in the story.
    2. Provide students with scraps of construction paper, a pencil for each and Crayola® Blunt-Tip Scissors. Encourage students to create simple shapes by tearing (holding paper between thumbs to follow a line), crumpling, cutting, feathering, etc.
    3. Give students a sheet of black construction paper and Crayola® Glue Sticks. Encourage students to create their own crow (inspired by Lio Lionni’s collage style) using the paper work techniques they just practiced.
    4. Early finishers can work on a collaborative scarecrow.
    5. Display all student work on a classroom or school hallway bulletin board to be viewed by peers.
  • Standards

    LA: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud.

    LA: Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.

    LA: Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.

    SS: Give examples of conflict, cooperation and interdependence among individuals, groups and nations.

    SS: Examine the relationship between personal wants and needs and global concerns.

    VA: Identify connections between visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum.

    VA: Use different media , techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories.

    VA: Know the difference between materials, techniques, and processes.

    VA: Use visual structures of art to communicate ideas.

  • Adaptations

    Study the habits, characteristics, and habitats of birds in Science. How are birds beneficial to humans? How are they a nuisance?

    Have students write about/ present a play about a time they had a conflict with someone. How did they resolve their problem?

    Do a unit study on agriculture. Which products come from which areas? What are some of the common troubles (insects, drought, flooding) farmers face, how do they rectify/counteract/prevent these issues?

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  • Creativity.
  • Capacity.
  • Collaboration.
  • Change.
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