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Bonnie Bagpipes

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Bonnie Bagpipes

Take a musical road to Scotland! Craft your very own pretend bagpipes with a paper bag and recycled gift wrap rolls. All you need now are kilts!

Supplies:

Steps:

1

1 No one is sure how bagpipes began, but people in the Balkans, Ireland and the Highlanders of Scotland were responsible for the bagpipe’s development. No one is sure about the origins of tartan plaids, either. Many people believe that tartans became associated with clans or families in Scotland in the 1700s. That’s when it was possible to mass-produce fabric in factories.

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2 Find pictures and information about bagpipes. Listen to recordings. If you can, watch bagpipes being played at a Celtic festival, parade, or other event.

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3 Traditional Highland bagpipes include one loud, high-pitched pipe or chanter and three big, loud upright pipes or drones. All of these pipes are connected to a bag held under the arm. The bag is either covered with velvet or the clan tartan plaid. Bagpipe players fill the bag with air by blowing through a blowpipe. To make your own set of pretend bagpipes, use your imagination and adapt these directions.

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4 Use Crayola Gel Markers to decorate a small brown paper bag with a tartan plaid. If you have Scot or Irish heritage, try to find out what your family’s plaid is, and duplicate it. Stuff your bag with crumpled newspaper so it looks like it is full of air.

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5 Use Crayola Scissors to cut one short piece of cardboard roll for the blow pipe. Cut a piece that is a bit longer for the chanter. Cut three even longer sections for the drones.

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6 Cut construction paper to fit all five cardboard rolls. Decorate your pipes if you like with Celtic designs. Attach the paper to the pipes with Crayola School Glue. Glue the three drones together at slight angles to each other. Air-dry your pipes.

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7 Insert the blowpipe into the open end of the paper bag. Glue the bag’s mouth around the end of the blow pipe. Hold in place with a rubber band. Air-dry your project. Remove the rubber band.

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8 Poke a hole in your bag near the blow pipe for the chanter, which hangs below the blow pipe when played. Glue it in place. Make slits in the bag for the three drones. Glue them in place. Lay the bagpipe flat to air-dry.

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9 Drape colorful yarn around the drones. Glue it in place. Air-dry before humming along on your bagpipes.

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