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Handy Horses

Wild horses from the west can be created with simple handprints and crayon, using Crayola® Multicultural Paint and Crayons.

  • Grade 1
    Grade 2
  • Multiple Lesson Periods
  • Directions

    1. During a unit of study focused on the settling of the American West, invite students to investigate the role of horses, both wild and domestic, as well as the role they played in the expansion of our country. Share a wide-variety of websites and printed texts on the topic with the class. Ask students to identify what they feel are the most important facts in their collective reading activities and discussions. Students may document their facts using Crayola® Erasable Colored Pencils and 5” x 8” (12.7 cm x 20.3 cm) note cards.
    2. Once students have completed the collection of facts, ask them to organization their note cards to tell the story of horses in the American West. Provide adult guidance as needed during this process if needed.
    3. In addition to their facts, invite students to create a visual of the time period. Using Crayola Multicultural Paint and Paint Brushes, as well large pieces of craft paper or recycled large paper bags, students create visuals for their presentations using their handprints as horses’ bodies. These can be done in a variety of shades and tones. Allow sufficient time for paint to dry completely.
    4. Students use Crayola Multicultural Crayons to add faces, ears, tails, manes, and hooves to their (handprint) horse bodies. Crayola Triangular or Construction Paper Crayons can be used to create a habitat or scene for the horses.
    5. Post student artwork prominently in the classroom in preparation for student presentations of their new knowledge about the American West.
  • Standards

    LA: With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for the grade level.

    LA: Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.

    LA: Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).

    SCI: Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

    SS: Examine the interaction of human beings and their physical environment, the use of land, building of cities, and ecosystem changes in selected locales and regions.

    VA: Students generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

    VA: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.

    VA: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.

    VA: Develop and refine artistic work for presentation.

    VA: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.

  • Adaptations

    Suggested resources for this lesson plan include: L Is for Lone Star, A Texas Alphabet by C. Crane; Round up, A Texas Number Book by Cr. Crane; The Legend of Blue Bonnet, retold by T. dePaula; 1 2 3 Texas, A Cool Counting Book by Puck; Native American, An Eyewitness Book by DK Publishing; B Is for Buckaroo, A Cowboy Alphabet by L.D. Whitney & G. Whitney

    Ask students to work individually or in small groups to write short stories about their American West artwork.

    Students compare the use of horses during the settling of the American West with the use of horses today.

    Use handprint technique and paint to create additional animals present in the environment during the settlement of the American West.

    Invite students to investigate the wild horses on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. They are descendants of shipwrecks from the time of early settlements in the area. Challenge students to find out how the herd continues to exist today.

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  • Creativity.
  • Capacity.
  • Collaboration.
  • Change.
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